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 Home | Tampa Bay Study | Reports| Mapping & Sediment Transport Modeling: Tampa Bay Estuary

This page is archived and is no longer being maintained. Content was last updated in 2015. For current research, visit http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/.
Introduction | Approach | Results/Discussion | Summary | Links | Contributing Scientists

U.S. Department of the Interior
U.S. Geological Survey
Open-File Report 01-397    [View PDF]

View other reports in the 2001
Tampa Bay Pilot Study Series:
1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9
View other reports pertaining to Geology & Geomorphology
Geology &
Geomorphology
View other reports pertaining to Hydrodynamics
Hydrodynamics

Task Leader: Mark Hansen

Tampa Bay Integrated Science Pilot Study:

Hydrographic and sub-surface mapping and sediment transport modeling

Figure 1. Satellite image of Tampa Bay indicating demonstration study sites near the Alafia River and Terra Ceia area.
Figure 1. Satellite image of Tampa Bay indicating demonstration study sites near the Alafia River and Terra Ceia area. Colors are near natural; healthy plants are green, agricultural fields are pink or beige.
[view enlargement]
Introduction

Tampa Bay has been adversely impacted by human activity since the 1900ís. Future environmental degradation may result from current plans to deepen and enlarge several ports, construction of a desalination plant, and terminus of an underwater gas pipeline from Alabama (Fig.1).

The Bay has undergone severe shoreline erosion, habitat loss, seagrass and scallop dieoffs, and many other negative changes. During its duration, this project addressed water quality, transport of contaminants associated with sediments, and habitat loss issues. This projects' specific focus was to identify locations of ground water seepage into the Bay.

The mapping component of the Tampa Bay Pilot Study applied seismic reflection profiling techniques and will coordinated with other project sub-tasks studying ground water issues. Investigations on transport of contaminants associated with sediments applied numerical wave and circulation models to determine sediment transport gradients and pathways. Before these models could be accurately applied, bathymetry had to be collected for the entire Bay.

This project collected bathymetry for the entire Bay using sonar and LIDAR techniques. There is an ongoing program to grossly map seafloor habitats with aerial photogrametric techniques; however, much of the Bay cannot be mapped due to high turbidity. This project augmented ongoing efforts by providing sea floor characterization maps, especially in areas of high turbidity. New habitat mapping technology developed by the USGS was applied in Tampa Bay. This new technology had the potential to identify sea grass species and density, as well as surficial sediment type.

Introduction | Approach | Results/Discussion | Summary | Links | Contributing Scientists

U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science
URL of this page is: http://gulfsci.usgs.gov/tampabay/reports/hansen1/index.html
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