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Maunalua Bay, Oahu. (Photo by Scot Izuka)

HAWAII VOLCANIC-ROCK AQUIFER STUDY

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ABOUT THE PACIFIC ISLANDS WSC

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USGS Water Science Centers are located in each state.

There is a USGS Water Science Center office in each State. Washington Oregon California Idaho Nevada Montana Wyoming Utah Colorado Arizona New Mexico North Dakota South Dakota Nebraska Kansas Oklahoma Texas Minnesota Iowa Missouri Arkansas Louisiana Wisconsin Illinois Mississippi Michigan Indiana Ohio Kentucky Tennessee Alabama Pennsylvania West Virginia Georgia Florida Caribbean Alaska Hawaii New York Vermont New Hampshire Maine Massachusetts South Carolina North Carolina Rhode Island Virginia Connecticut New Jersey Maryland-Delaware-D.C.

HAWAII VOLCANIC-ROCK AQUIFER STUDY


HISTORY OF USGS NATIONAL GROUNDWATER ASSESSMENTS THAT INCLUDED HAWAII

Photo of wells in the southern Lihue basin, Kauai. A study of groundwater resources in the southern Lihue basin was one of many local studies since RASA that advanced understanding of groundwater in Hawaii (photo by Scot Izuka).

Wells in the southern Lihue basin, Kauai. A study of groundwater resources in the southern Lihue basin was one of many local studies since RASA that advanced understanding of groundwater in Hawaii (photo by Scot Izuka).

Hawaii has been included in periodic national groundwater-resource assessments by the USGS since the assessment in 1923 by Meinzer, who described the large amounts of water being produced from basalt aquifers in Honolulu. Meinzer also described dike-impounded and perched groundwater bodies in Hawaii. In the 1963 assessment, Davis described Hawaii’s “remarkable” groundwater resources—as well as its high rate of groundwater extraction given its small size compared to other states. In the 1978 assessment, Takasaki described the generally abundant nature of groundwater resources in Hawaii, but also described problems associated with seawater intrusion resulting from overuse and misuse.

In the 1980s-90s, Hawaii was included in the USGS Regional Aquifer System Analysis (RASA) program, which used newly emerging tools such as numerical groundwater modeling and geographic information systems (GIS) to make significant contributions to the understanding of groundwater in Hawaii. The RASA study, however, was limited to Oahu. Also, new hydrologic, geologic, and climate information have become available and new tools for hydrologic analysis have emerged since the RASA study.

The Hawaii Volcanic-Rock Aquifer Study will build on the previous assessments and incorporate the updates and advances to assess groundwater resources not only on Oahu, but heavily stressed aquifers on other islands as well.

[References: Meinzer (1923), Davis (1963), Takasaki (1978), Nichols and others (1996)]

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Page Last Modified: Thursday, 18-Jul-2013 20:59:24 EDT