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Spatial and temporal patterns and ecological effects of canal-water intrusion into the A.R.M. Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

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Metadata:


Identification_Information:
Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator:
Paul McCormick

William Orem

Publication_Date: 200810
Title:
Spatial and temporal patterns and ecological effects of canal-water intrusion into the A.R.M. Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: report
Series_Information:
Series_Name: Hydrogeology Journal
Issue_Identification: v. 117
Online_Linkage: <https://sofia.usgs.gov/projects/index.php?project_url=eco_lox>
Description:
Abstract:
This study was part of a coordinated effort between USGS and the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge to understand causes and predict patterns of canal-water intrusion and to assess effects on sensitive wetland biota and functions. Synoptic surveys, monitoring along canal-water gradients, and field experimentation were initiated in FY04 with the following objectives:

(1) document spatial and temporal patterns of canal-water intrusion into the Refuge; (2) quantify nutrient concentrations and shifts in the nature and degree of nutrient limitation along canal-water gradients; (3) quantify changes in key microbial, periphyton, and plant processes along these gradients; (4) link changes in biota and process rates to water chemistry changes caused by canal-water intrusion through field experimentation.

Purpose:
Alterations to groundwater and surface-water hydrology and water chemistry in south Florida have contributed to increased flows of mineral-rich (i.e., high conductivity) canal water into historically rainfall-driven (low conductivity) areas of the Everglades. The Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge has largely retained its historic low conductivity or "soft-water" condition, which supports a characteristic periphyton community, wetland plant species that may also be adapted to soft-water conditions, and lower rates of key ecosystem processes (e.g., decomposition) than in areas of the Everglades exposed to canal discharges. Recent monitoring data indicate a trend towards increased intrusion of canal water into the Refuge interior, but the causes (e.g., changing water management strategies, weather patterns) and magnitude of ecological effects resulting from this intrusion are not clear.

Projects that improve the quantity, timing, and distribution of water supplies to the natural system are at the core of Everglades restoration efforts. This study addresses a major Department of Interior (DOI) concern that the quality of water available for these projects may be inadequate to support natural ecosystem functioning. While phosphorus impacts on Everglades populations and processes have been extensively studied, the environmental effects of other major water quality changes remain poorly understood. This study will improve understanding of the effects of elevated marsh concentrations of water quality constituents other than P resulting from increased supplies of canal water to the natural system.

Time_Period_of_Content:
Time_Period_Information:
Range_of_Dates/Times:
Beginning_Date: 2004
Ending_Date: 2007
Currentness_Reference: ground condition
Status:
Progress: Complete
Maintenance_and_Update_Frequency: None planned
Spatial_Domain:
Bounding_Coordinates:
West_Bounding_Coordinate: -80.5
East_Bounding_Coordinate: -80.25
North_Bounding_Coordinate: 26.75
South_Bounding_Coordinate: 26.3
Keywords:
Theme:
Theme_Keyword_Thesaurus: none
Theme_Keyword: surface water
Theme_Keyword: groundwater
Theme_Keyword: nutrients
Theme_Keyword: biology
Theme_Keyword: chemistry
Theme_Keyword: hydrology
Theme_Keyword: wetland
Theme_Keyword: paleohydrology
Theme_Keyword: contaminants
Theme:
Theme_Keyword_Thesaurus: ISO 19115 Topic Category
Theme_Keyword: environment
Theme_Keyword: inlandWaters
Theme_Keyword: 007
Theme_Keyword: 012
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus:
Department of Commerce, 1995, Countries, Dependencies, Areas of Special Sovereignty, and Their Principal Administrative Divisions, Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 10-4, Washington, DC, National Institute of Standards and Technology
Place_Keyword: United States
Place_Keyword: US
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus:
U.S. Department of Commerce, 1987, Codes for the identification of the States, the District of Columbia and the outlying areas of the United States, and associated areas (Federal Information Processing Standard 5-2): Washington, DC, NIST
Place_Keyword: Florida
Place_Keyword: FL
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus:
Department of Commerce, 1990, Counties and Equivalent Entities of the United States, Its Possessions, and Associated Areas, FIPS 6-3, Washington, DC, National Institute of Standards and Technology
Place_Keyword: Palm Beach County
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus: USGS Geographic Names Information System
Place_Keyword: Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge
Place_Keyword: Arthur R. Marshall- Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus: none
Place_Keyword: Central Everglades
Access_Constraints: none
Use_Constraints: none
Point_of_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: William Orem
Contact_Organization: U.S. Geological Survey
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing address
Address: 956 National Center
City: Reston
State_or_Province: VA
Postal_Code: 20192
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 703 648-6273
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 703 648-6419
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: borem@usgs.gov
Data_Set_Credit: Jud Harvey and Carol Kendall also worked on this project
Cross_Reference:
Citation_Information:
Originator:
Harvey, Judson W.

McCormick, Paul V.

Publication_Date: 200902
Title:
Groundwater's significance to changing hydrology, water chemistry, and biological communities of a floodplain ecosystem
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: report
Series_Information:
Series_Name: Hydrogeology Journal
Issue_Identification: v. 17, n. 1
Publication_Information:
Publication_Place: Dordrecht, The Netherlands
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Other_Citation_Details:
accessed as of 12/7/2009

The article was originally published in the Hydrogeology Journal.

Online_Linkage:
<http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/jharvey/pdf/Harvey&McCormick_2009_gladesGW.pdf>
Cross_Reference:
Citation_Information:
Originator:
Chang, C. C. Y.

McCormick, P. V.; Newman, S.; Elliott, E. M.

Publication_Date: 2009
Title:
Isotopic indicators of environmental change in a subtropical wetland
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: report
Series_Information:
Series_Name: Ecological Indicators
Issue_Identification: v. 9, n. 5, p. 825-836
Publication_Information:
Publication_Place: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher: Elsevier Science B. V.
Other_Citation_Details:
accessed as of 2/22/2010

The full article is available via journal subscription or single article purchase. The abstract may be viewed on the Science Direct website by selecting the volume and issue number.

Online_Linkage: <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/1470160X>

Data_Quality_Information:
Logical_Consistency_Report:
The Refuge has established a conductivity monitoring network to document spatial and temporal patterns of canal-water intrusion. Twelve of these monitoring sites, located along an east-west gradient of canal influence across the center of the Refuge, were selected for more intensive sampling, including characterization of soil and porewater nutrients, nutrient cycling rates, and periphyton and plant communities and productivity.
Completeness_Report:
A Refuge-wide synoptic survey of surface-water conductivity and marsh soil and plant nutrient levels at 130 sites was completed. Additional samples were collected at each site to assess whether stable isotope compositions of soil and vegetation and soil uranium concentrations could provide useful environmental markers of the extent and effects of canal-water intrusion.

A 12-station transect monitoring network was established along a canal-water gradient. Measurements at these stations included water chemistry and soil and plant nutrients. A transect-wide decomposition experiment was also initiated to measure changes in organic matter mineralization rates and nutrient storage along the gradient. Nearly continuous monitoring of conductivity began at several sites in December 2004 and is now being conducted at all sites as water levels allow. Periodic periphyton sampling began in March 2005 and a detailed characterization of vegetation along this canal-water gradient began in the summer of 2005.

Lineage:
Process_Step:
Process_Description:
A Refuge-wide synoptic survey of surface-water conductivity and marsh soil and plant nutrient levels at 130 sites was completed in February 2004 in coordination with the SFWMD. Additional samples were collected at each site to assess whether stable isotope compositions of soil and vegetation and soil uranium concentrations could provide useful environmental markers of the extent and effects of canal-water intrusion. A 12-station transect monitoring network was established along a canal-water gradient in May 2004. Measurements of water chemistry and soil and plant nutrients at these stations began in August 2004. A transect-wide decomposition experiment was also initiated in August 2004 to measure changes in organic matter mineralization rates and nutrient storage along the gradient. Nearly continuous monitoring of conductivity began at several sites in December 2004 and is now being conducted at all sites as water levels allow. A field fertilization experiment is being designed and will be initiated in October 2004.
Process_Date: 2004
Process_Step:
Process_Description:
Periodic periphyton sampling began in March 2005 and a detailed characterization of vegetation along this canal-water gradient began in the summer of 2005.

A field dosing experiment was initiated in March 2005 to quantify changes in soil, microbial, and vegetation characteristics in response to elevated conductivity produced by canal-water intrusion into the Refuge. Fifteen experimental plots along a sawgrass-slough fringe have been dosed monthly since March 2005 with a mineral solution containing the major ions Ca2+, Cl-, K+, Mg2+, HCO3-, Na+ and SO42- in a ratio similar to that for canal water. Triplicate plots are being dosed with a mineral solution to produce mineral pulses that approximate 0 (control), 12, 25, and 50% of canal mineral levels.

A series of laboratory experiments began in January 2005 to better understand and predict effects of changing water quality on key vegetation communities and microbial processes in the Refuge.

Process_Date: 2005
Process_Step:
Process_Description:
A second experiment conducted during FY06 examined sawgrass responses to mineral enrichment. Sawgrass seedlings grown in different soil types and mineral treatments exhibited faster growth in response to both elevated soil P and higher loading of minerals compared to untreated soil from an interior (low P and mineral content) slough.
Process_Date: 2006
Process_Step:
Process_Description:
Dataloggers will continue to be deployed to obtain nearly continuous measurements of surface-water conductivity. The Refuge will continue monthly water-quality sampling. Final soil and porewater chemistry measurements at these sites will focus on sulfur chemistry and include measurements of sulfate and sulfide concentrations as well as porewater redox and soil sulfur. These measurements will be combined with a laboratory experiment to assess the extent of sulfate contamination along this gradient and the spatial relationship between sulfate loading and sulfate reduction.

The last set of decomposition bags will be collected in August 2007 (36 months of incubation). Additional bags placed at two sites to determine effects of hydroperiod on decomposition rates also will be collected at this time (22 months of incubation). Samples will be processed in the laboratory to measure rates of plant mass and nutrient loss.

Site sampled for total soil and plant-tissue nutrients in FY 2006 will be re-visited and additional samples will be collected to measure concentration of extractable nutrients and minerals, including N, P, Ca, K, Mg, iron (Fe), and aluminum (Al). These data will complement total soil elemental concentrations measured in FY 2006.

Monthly dosing will continue with the assistance of Refuge staff. Measurements of soil, porewater, and vegetation mineral accumulation and macrophyte and periphyton composition begun in FY 2005 will continue. Microbial enzyme measurements initiated in collaboration with investigators from the SFWMD will be completed.

Controlled laboratory experiments are being conducted to measure P fluxes from soils from different transect sites under different hydrologic and water quality conditions. In phase 1, soil cores from selected transect sites will be incubated in the laboratory under different hydrologic conditions to measure levels of potentially bioavailable P. Replicate soil cores will be incubated under flooded, saturated, and drained conditions for an extended period (1-2 months). Incubation chambers will then be replenished with fresh low-P water and filtered to measure release of soluble reactive P (SRP).

In phase 2, soils from a minimally impacted location will be incubated in water containing different conductivity levels (i.e., a laboratory solution containing major ions at concentrations similar to those in canal waters) but the same background concentration of P. Initially, small soil samples will be incubated in test tubes for short periods (several days), drained and then agitated in distilled water, and filtered to measure SRP. Longer term experiments will involve incubating larger soil cores in the same water quality treatments and then treating them as described for phase 1 experiments. Microbial respiration and biomass will also be measured to understand the role of microbial activity in P release.

In phase 3, soil cores from the same minimally impacted location will be exposed to low P waters of varying conductivity prior to replenishment with waters containing a specified concentration of SRP. Incubation containers will be slowly shaken (minimum speed for shaker table) for a 24-h period and rates of SRP loss will be measured via periodic sampling. Microbial respiration and biomass will also be measured to understand the role of microbial activity in P retention.

The design of a laboratory experiment during FY07 is underway. Cores containing the surface soil-litter layer (0-10 cm depth) from a location in the Refuge interior will be incubated in the presence of surface-water containing different concentrations of major mineral ions in proportions similar to those documented across canal gradients. Elemental accumulation and availability in the litter layer will be tracked. After several weeks of mineral enrichment, remaining cores will be exposed to mineral-poor water from the Refuge interior and the retention of different elements will continue to be monitored.

Laboratory processing of soil cores collected during FY06 will be completed early in FY07.

In an initial experiment, replicate soil cores or slurries will be incubated in the laboratory in the presence of elevated sulfate and/or phosphate concentrations. Sediment oxygen demand, soil redox and sulfide levels will be monitored in each treatment to track general microbial activity and the activity of sulfate reducing bacteria. A second experiment will be designed based on initial findings.

Process_Date: 2007
Process_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Paul McCormick
Contact_Organization:
Lake Okeechobee Division, South Florida Water Management District
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing and physical address
Address: 3301 Gun Club Road
City: West Palm Beach
State_or_Province: FL
Postal_Code: 33406
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 561 682-2866
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 561 640-6815
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: pmccormi@sfwmd.gov

Metadata_Reference_Information:
Metadata_Date: 20100413
Metadata_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Heather Henkel
Contact_Organization: U.S. Geological Survey
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing and physical address
Address: 600 Fourth Street South
City: St. Petersburg
State_or_Province: FL
Postal_Code: 33701
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 727 803-8747 ext 3028
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 727 803-2030
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: sofia-metadata@usgs.gov
Metadata_Standard_Name: Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata
Metadata_Standard_Version: FGDC-STD-001-1998
Metadata_Access_Constraints: none
Metadata_Use_Constraints:
This metadata record may have been copied from the SOFIA website and may not be the most recent version. Please check <https://sofia.usgs.gov/metadata> to be sure you have the most recent version.

This page is <https://sofia.usgs.gov/metadata/sflwww/eco_LOX.html>

U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
Comments and suggestions? Contact: Heather Henkel - Webmaster
Generated by mp version 2.8.18 on Tue Apr 13 13:48:38 2010