Home Archived October 29, 2018
(i)
USGS Home
SOFIA Home

Ground Water Flow and Transport for the SICS and TIME Models

Metadata also available as - [Outline] - [Parseable text] - [XML]

Frequently-anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title: Ground Water Flow and Transport for the SICS and TIME Models
Abstract:
The objective of this project is to develop a numerical groundwater flow model that can be used with the TIME surface water model to quantify and predict flows and salinities in the coastal wetlands of the southern Everglades. Field data will be collected to help formulate the hydrogeologic conceptual model and for calibration of the model to flows, water levels, and salinities. Data collection will consist of monitoring well installation, seepage measurements, spatial characterization of peat thickness, and continuous monitoring of water levels and salinities at selected locations.

The SICS model encompasses Taylor Slough and uses a 300-m grid resolution. The larger TIME model encompasses Shark and Taylor Sloughs and uses a 500-m grid resolution. A groundwater model has already been developed and linked with the SICS surface water model. This integrated SICS model simulates flows, stages, and salinities for the 5-year period from 1995 to 2000. Plans for the SICS model are to extend the simulation period through 2002 and complete a linkage to the South Florida Water Management Districtís model, called the "2x2" model. The SICS model will then be capable of performing detailed restoration scenarios for the Taylor Slough area. A preliminary groundwater model has also been developed for the TIME area, but this groundwater model has not yet been linked with a surface water model. Ray Schaffranek is currently finalizing a 3-month simulation with the TIME surface water model. As part of this project, the groundwater model will be linked with the TIME surface water model, and the simulation period will be extended to cover 2 years. A related CERP (Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan) project will extend this simulation period to 7 years and link with the 2x2 to perform Everglade restoration scenarios. This project also involves quantifying surface water and groundwater interactions by using nested monitoring wells and seepage meters. Data from the field studies are used to calibrate and verify the SICS and TIME models.

Supplemental_Information:
This project is now part of the SICS and TIME model linkages and development in support of Everglades Restoration project
  1. How should this data set be cited?

    Chris Langevin Melinda Wolfert, Marc Stewart, 20060421, Ground Water Flow and Transport for the SICS and TIME Models.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?

    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -81.555039
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -80.304809
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 25.976713
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 25.026572

  3. What does it look like?

  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?

    Beginning_Date: 01-Oct-2000
    Ending_Date: 30-Sep-2006
    Currentness_Reference: publication date

  5. What is the general form of this data set?

    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: html tables

  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?

    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?

      Indirect_Spatial_Reference: SICS and TIME

    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?

  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?


Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)

    • Chris Langevin

  2. Who also contributed to the data set?

    David Garces also worked on the project. FY 2004 project personnel include Eric Swain, Melinda Wolfert, Marc Stewart, and Peter Swarzenski.

  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?

    Chris Langevin
    U.S. Geological Survey
    3110 SW 9th Avenue
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
    USA

    954 377-5917 (voice)
    954 377-5901 (FAX)
    langevin@usgs.gov


Why was the data set created?

The interaction between surface water and groundwater can be a potentially significant component of the hydrologic water budget in the Everglades. Recent research has shown that surface water and groundwater interactions also can affect salinities in coastal wetlands. As Everglades restoration is largely dependent upon "getting the water right", the U.S. Geological Survey is developing the TIME (Tides and Inflows in the Mangroves of the Everglades) and SICS (Southern Inland and Coastal Systems) models, hydrodynamic surface water models of the southern Everglades. The purpose of the TIME and SICS models is to accurately simulate flows and salinities in the coastal wetlands of the southern Everglades. Once calibrated, these models will be used to evaluate proposed restoration scenarios by feeding hydrologic information into the ATLSS biological models. These biological models are highly sensitive to hydrologic inputs such as flows, stages, and salinities; thus, the TIME and SICS models are expected to play an important role in linking the hydrologic component of the Everglades to the biologic component.

In recent years, this project focused on developing a groundwater component for the SICS model, an integrated model of Taylor Slough and northern Florida Bay. The SICS model is now calibrated, operational, and providing important insight into the flow and salinity patterns of the southern coastal Everglades. Hydrologic output from the SICS model is being used in development of ATLSS fish models. The next step with this groundwater project is to extend the methodologies developed as part of the SICS modeling effort to the much larger TIME model.


How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?

  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?

    Date: 2002 (process 1 of 6)
    The first task of this project was to document the SEAWAT code, a computer program for simulation of variable-density ground water flow. The SEAWAT documentation has been published and the code is being distributed through the website <http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/seawat/>. The ground water model for the TIME area, which is being developed with the SEAWAT program, will be coupled with the surface water and transport TIME model, a two-dimensional overland flow and solute transport model. A 10-layer SEAWAT model has been developed and linked with the Southern Inland and Coastal System (SICS). A 10-layer SEAWAT model encompassing the TIME domain has been developed and is currently being calibrated with the latest airborne geophysical data and existing hydrologic data. Nested monitoring wells were installed at the data collection sites of three of the associated projects listed above. These sites include: New River near Chokoloskee, at the NEX1 ET monitoring site, and at the Upstream Taylor River freshwater flow site. At each site a shallow and deep well were installed and instrumented with a pressure transducer and conductivity probe that measure and record on 15-minute intervals.

    Person who carried out this activity:

    Chris Langevin
    U.S. Geological Survey
    3110 SW 9th Avenue
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
    USA

    954 377-5917 (voice)
    954 377-5901 (FAX)
    langevin@usgs.gov

    Date: 2005 (process 2 of 6)
    Little is known about the geology and aquifer system in southwestern Shark Slough. There are some shallow groundwater monitoring wells in the area, but no wells have been drilled to depths greater than 30 feet. This lack of data causes numerous problems for the development and calibration of the groundwater flow model. The purpose of this task is to install shallow, intermediate, and deep groundwater monitoring wells at a single site in southwestern Shark Slough. The location and depths of the wells will be based on airborne electromagnetic data, proximity to other monitoring sites, and geological materials encountered during drilling. The objective of this task, therefore, is to install 3 groundwater monitoring wells at different depths at one location in southwestern Shark Slough.

    The plans for installing the wells are as follows. One month prior to mobilization, all equipment, tools, and accessories will be purchased or tested and repaired. Approximately one week will be required to construct drilling platforms at the selected site and transport drilling equipment by airboat. The drilling equipment consists of a hydraulic engine that turns the drill stem, a tripod, air compressor, water pump, and miscellaneous hardware and drilling supplies. The deep monitoring well will be installed first to determine geology and locate permeable zones for remaining wells. We will attempt to install the deep well at a depth of approximately 150 feet, which is approximately the depth of the base of the Gray Limestone aquifer (Fish and Stewart, 1990). The remaining two wells will be installed at approximate depths of 75 and 20 feet. We anticipate that the well installation will take 6 to 8 weeks to complete.

    Person who carried out this activity:

    Marc Stewart
    U.S. Geological Survey
    3110 SW 9th Avenue
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
    USA

    954 377-5947 (voice)
    954 377-5901 (FAX)
    mastewar@usgs.gov

    Date: 2005 (process 3 of 6)
    Measurement of surface water/groundwater interactions

    The purpose of this task is to quantify the interaction of surface water and groundwater by deploying seepage meters and mapping the thickness of peat and marl. Calibration of the SICS integrated model indicates that additional data are required to verify the simulated rates of leakage between surface water and groundwater. With the current version of the SICS model, there is no way to guarantee that the simulated interaction between surface water and groundwater, which can be significant during certain times, is accurate. Therefore, the objective of this study is to directly measure seepage and map the thickness of the units that restrict vertical flow.

    Traditional seepage meters are notorious for providing ambiguous data in low-flow settings. As part of this task, we will use the latest technology, either heat-pulse, electromagnetic, or sonic methods, to develop a seepage meter for use in the Everglades. This new seepage meter will be deployed for a short time (approximately one week) at the nested groundwater monitoring wells constructed last year and at the new wells constructed as part of this work plan. This will allow us to "rate" the head differences measured in the wells to the flow measured by the meter. Once the rating is completed for each site, we are optimistic that the continuously measured heads in the wells will allow us to calculate continuous seepage rates. The meter will also be deployed for short times at other locations and at other times to determine the spatial and temporal variability in seepage rates. In addition to the seepage measurements, measurements of peat thickness will be made along airboat trails to develop a map of peat thickness. At several locations, closely spaced measurements also will be made to characterize the spatial variability in peat thickness. The peat thickness measurements will be used with the seepage information to characterize the hydraulic properties of the peat.

    Person who carried out this activity:

    Melinda Wolfert
    U.S. Geological Survey
    3110 SW 9th Avenue
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
    USA

    954 377-5955 (voice)
    954 377-5901 (FAX)
    mwolfert@usgs.gov

    Date: 2005 (process 4 of 6)
    Continuous monitoring and geophysical logging at selected groundwater wells

    The purpose of this task is to collect continuous water level and salinity data at the monitoring wells installed as part of this project. There are currently six groundwater monitoring wells at three locations and plans for the installation of three additional wells. Instruments for measuring and logging continuous water levels and salinities are rented from HIF. Monthly or bimonthly visits by motor boat, airboat, or helicopter are required to download data and ensure data integrity.

    Person who carried out this activity:

    Marc Stewart
    U.S. Geological Survey
    3110 SW 9th Avenue
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
    USA

    954 377-5947 (voice)
    954 377-5901 (FAX)
    mastewar@usgs.gov

    Date: 2005 (process 5 of 6)
    Development and calibration of a variable-density groundwater flow and solute-transport model

    The first step in the continued development of the groundwater model is to update the aquifer characterization with the data collected during the installation of the deep well. This new information should significantly increase the ability to simulate groundwater flow in the southwestern part of Shark Slough. The next step is to update the representation of the peat layer in the model with the new data collected as part of the seepage work. Once this data is incorporated into the model, traditional calibration procedures will be used to adjust model parameters until simulated values of water levels, salinities, and leakage match with observed values. The calibration procedure will focus on the accurate representation of leakage between surface water and groundwater. This will ensure that the TIME surface water model will contain an accurate groundwater component once the models are coupled.

    Person who carried out this activity:

    Chris Langevin
    U.S. Geological Survey
    3110 SW 9th Avenue
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
    USA

    954 377-5917 (voice)
    954 377-5901 (FAX)
    langevin@usgs.gov

    Date: 2005 (process 6 of 6)
    Work planned for FY2004 includes:

    1. Finalize and document the SICS integrated model

    The documentation for the SICS surface water model has been completed and is scheduled for publication by the end of FY03; however, documentation has not been prepared that describes the coupled model. For this task, documentation in the form of a journal article will be prepared to describe the methodology used to link the surface and groundwater models and to describe model results. This manuscript will be submitted to an international journal, Finalizing the SICS model requires a final comparison between field data and simulated model output. These comparisons and explanations of discrepancies will be described in the journal article. This task will also require that each hydrologic boundary in the SICS model is driven by output from the 2x2.

    2. Development of the TIME groundwater model and coupling with the TIME surface water model

    The first step in the continued development of the groundwater model is to update the model with new field data. This new information should significantly increase our ability to simulate groundwater flow in the southwestern part of Shark Slough. The next step is to update the representation of the peat layer in the model with the new data collected as part of the seepage work. Once this data is incorporated into the model, traditional calibration procedures will be used to adjust model parameters until simulated values of water levels, salinities, and leakage match with observed values. The calibration procedure will focus on the accurate representation of leakage between surface water and groundwater. This will ensure that the TIME surface water model will contain an accurate groundwater component once the models are coupled.

    3. Continuous monitoring at groundwater wells and measurement of surface water/groundwater interactions

    The purpose of this task is to continue collecting continuous water level and salinity data at the monitoring wells installed as part of this project. There are currently six groundwater monitoring wells at three locations. Instruments for measuring and logging continuous water levels and salinities are rented from HIF. Monthly or bimonthly visits by motor boat, airboat, or helicopter are required to download data and ensure data integrity.

    Person who carried out this activity:

    Chris Langevin
    U.S. Geological Survey
    3110 SW 9th Avenue
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
    USA

    954 377-5917 (voice)
    954 377-5901 (FAX)
    langevin@usgs.gov

  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?

    Guo, Weixing Langevin, Christian D., 2002, SEAWAT: A Computer Program for Simulation of Three-Dimensional Variable-Density Ground-Water Flow: U.S. Geological Survey, Tallahassee, FL.

    Online Links:

    Guo, Weixing Langevin, Christian D., 2002, User's Guide to SEAWAT: A Computer Program for Simulation of Three-Dimensional Variable-Density Ground-Water Flow: Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations Book 6, Chapter A7, U.S. Geological Survey, Tallahassee, FL.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: supersedes OFR 01-434
    Langevin, Christian Shoemaker, W. Barclay, Guo, Wei, 2003, MODFLOW-2000, The U.S. Geolgical Survey Modular Ground-Water Model - Documentation of the SWAWAT-2000 Version with the Variable-Density Flow Process (VDF) and the Integrated MT3DMS Transport Process (IMT): USGS Open-File Report 03-426, U.S. Geological Survey, Tallahassee, FL.

    Online Links:

    Langevin, Christian D. Swain, Eric D., Wolfert, Me, 2004, Simulation of Integrated Surface-Water/Ground-Water Flow and Salinity for a Coastal Wetland and Adjacent Estuary: USGS Open-File Report 2004-1097, U.S. Geological Survey, Tallahassee, FL.

    Online Links:


How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?

  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?

  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?

  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?

    not available

  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?

    not applicable


How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?

Access_Constraints: none
Use_Constraints: none

  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)

    Heather Henkel
    U.S. Geological Survey
    600 Fourth Street South
    St. Petersburg, FL 33701
    USA

    727 803-8747 ext 3028 (voice)
    727 803-2030 (FAX)
    sofia-metadata@usgs.gov

  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?

    Groundwater flow and transport for the SICS and TIME models

  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?

    No warrantees are implied or explicit for the data

  4. How can I download or order the data?


Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 15-Nov-2006
Metadata author:
Heather Henkel
U.S. Geological Survey
600 Fourth Street South
St. Petersburg, FL 33701
USA

727 803-8747 ext 3028 (voice)
727 803-2030 (FAX)
sofia-metadata@usgs.gov

Metadata standard:
Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)


This page is <https://sofia.usgs.gov/metadata/sflwww/gw_flow_trans_TIME.faq.html>

U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, Center for Coastal Geology
Comments and suggestions? Contact: Heather Henkel - Webmaster
Generated by mp version 2.8.18 on Wed Nov 15 11:47:21 2006