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Monitoring Sub-aquatic Vegetation Through Remote Sensing: a Pilot Study in Florida Bay

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Metadata:


Identification_Information:
Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator:
G. Lynn Wingard

Peter Chirico; Lawrence Handley

Publication_Date: 200604
Title:
Monitoring Sub-aquatic Vegetation Through Remote Sensing: a Pilot Study in Florida Bay
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: database
Online_Linkage: <https://sofia.usgs.gov/projects/monitor_sav/>
Description:
Abstract:
This pilot study will focus on Florida Bay, a region that suffered the loss of 40,000 ha of turtle grass in a die-off event that began in 1987, and a small, localized die-off in 1999. These events were well documented and provide a baseline for testing methods of monitoring grass beds remotely. Remote sensing data, including aerial photos and satellite imagery data, and data extracted from sediment cores will be used to examine the long-term sequences of events leading up to seagrass die-off events.

The objectives of this pilot study are to develop a methodology for monitoring spatial and temporal changes in sub-aquatic vegetation using remote sensing, satellite imagery, and aerial photography, and to analyze potential causes of seagrass die-off using geographic, geologic and biologic tools. The ultimate goal is to develop a method for forecasting potential sea-grass die-offs and to determine if remediation efforts would be cost-effective. Florida Bay is selected for the pilot study because the thorough documentation of the 1987-1988 die-off event provides a baseline for examining data preceding and succeeding the event. In addition, a small well studied die-off occurred in 1999-2000 at Barnes Key in Florida Bay. A 10-15 km2 portion of Florida Bay that encompasses areas affected by the 1987 and 1999 die-offs will be analyzed for this pilot study. Current remotely sensed data, aerial photos and satellite images from this area will be used to test different platforms, determine detection limits, and to attempt to isolate distinct signals for different types of vegetation. When ground-truthing is completed, archived remotely sensed data and/or aerial photographs can then be used to examine the sequences of events leading up to the die-offs. The remotely sensed data can be compared and compiled with the data collected by seagrass biologists in 1987 and 1999, and to sediment core data collected at the sites of seagrass die-off. Sediment cores provide a long-term perspective on changes in nutrient geochemistry, substrate, water chemistry (salinity, temperature, oxygen), and changes in the biota. The geologic, biologic and remotely sensed data will be integrated and analyzed to determine the patterns of change and sequences of events that occur in healthy seagrass beds and in beds undergoing a die-off.

Several remote sensor types will be compared in this study to determine the ideal sensor bands and spatial resolution necessary to detect and monitor the health of seagrass beds. The sensors to be tested include Landsat 7 (30m multi-spectral spatial resolution), ASTER (15 and 30m multi-spectral), Quickbird (2.5m multi-spectral and <1m panchromatic), and large-scale aerial photography (anticipated spatial resolution .25m with visible and near-infrared bands). Imagery with bands in the blue wavelength may help to penetrate water and infrared or near-infrared bands are predicted to perform better for resolving vegetation. It is theorized that through a combination of blue, and infrared bands and higher spatial resolution it will be possible to map the extent of seagrass beds. Although Landsat ETM+ 7 has several bands in desirable wavelengths, this sensor is predicted to be too course of a dataset to resolve individual seagrass beds. Landsat ETM+ may be used to develop an index of chlorophyll values that may be translated into a measure of seagrass health. ASTERís multiple infrared bands and increased spatial resolution may be successful in distinguishing between the types of vegetation, but these bands are not designed for water penetration. Higher spatial resolution platforms are predicted to have better mapping capabilities. The Quickbird sensor can provide 2.5m spatial resolution with multi-spectral capability. The multi-spectral bands include a blue band for water penetration and a near-infrared band for vegetation detection. Finally, aerial photography flown at low altitude represents the highest spatial resolution (.25m) and can be collected in visible and near-infrared to allow processing of blue and infrared bands. A combination of sensor types to maximize both spatial resolution and spectral signatures may provide the best solution for mapping and monitoring seagrass beds.

Purpose:
Seagrass beds are essential components of any marine ecosystem because they provide feeding grounds, nurseries, and habitats for many forms of marine life, including commercially valuable species; they are important foraging grounds for migratory birds; and they anchor sediments and impede resuspension and coastal erosion during storms. This valuable natural resource has been suffering die-offs around the world in recent years, yet the causes of these die-offs are undetermined. The purpose of this project is to use a number of tools - geographic, geologic, and biologic - to investigate the causes of seagrass die-offs and to develop methods that can be used to monitor the health of seagrass meadows. If we understand the causes of the die-offs and can easily monitor the health of seagrass beds, then resource managers have a tool for forecasting areas of potential die-offs.

By integrating remotely sensed data, biological data and core data the long-term (decadalscale) sequences of events leading up to die-off events can be examined. These data can be contrasted to normal seasonal changes that occur in healthy grass beds to establish criteria for identifying areas that may be on the threshold of experiencing a decline. This provides a very powerful predictive tool for resource managers. By examining the causes of die-off and the natural patterns of change in seagrass meadows over biologically significant periods of time we can determine the components of change that may be related to anthropogenic activities versus natural cycles of change. This information would allow resource managers to make informed decisions about the cost-effectiveness of and mechanisms for remediation, if an area of decline was identified via the predictive tool. Once the predictive tools and potential remediation tools have been developed in this pilot study, in well-studied seagrass meadows, the tools can be applied to threatened coastal ecosystems around the country and worldwide.

Supplemental_Information: This project ended in 2004.
Time_Period_of_Content:
Time_Period_Information:
Range_of_Dates/Times:
Beginning_Date: 20021001
Ending_Date: 20040930
Currentness_Reference: ground condition
Status:
Progress: Complete
Maintenance_and_Update_Frequency: None planned
Spatial_Domain:
Description_of_Geographic_Extent:
10-15 km2 portion of Florida Bay from Rabbit Key to Barnes Key that encompasses areas affected by the 1987 and 1999 die-offs.
Bounding_Coordinates:
West_Bounding_Coordinate: -80.87
East_Bounding_Coordinate: -80.75
North_Bounding_Coordinate: 25
South_Bounding_Coordinate: 24.9
Keywords:
Theme:
Theme_Keyword_Thesaurus: none
Theme_Keyword: SAV
Theme_Keyword: submerged aquatic vegetation
Theme_Keyword: remote sensing
Theme_Keyword: biology
Theme_Keyword: ecology
Theme_Keyword: mapping
Theme_Keyword: seagrass
Theme_Keyword: turtle grass
Theme_Keyword: sediment cores
Theme_Keyword: aerial photography mapping
Theme_Keyword: habitat classification
Theme:
Theme_Keyword_Thesaurus: ISO 19115 Topic Category
Theme_Keyword: biota
Theme_Keyword: environment
Theme_Keyword: imageryBaseMapsEarthCover
Theme_Keyword: inlandWaters
Theme_Keyword: 002
Theme_Keyword: 007
Theme_Keyword: 010
Theme_Keyword: 012
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus:
Department of Commerce, 1995, Countries, Dependencies, Areas of Special Sovereignty, and Their Principal Administrative Divisions, Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 10-4, Washington, DC, National Institute of Standards and Technology
Place_Keyword: United States
Place_Keyword: US
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus:
U.S. Department of Commerce, 1987, Codes for the identification of the States, the District of Columbia and the outlying areas of the United States, and associated areas (Federal Information Processing Standard 5-2): Washington, DC, NIST
Place_Keyword: Florida
Place_Keyword: FL
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus:
Department of Commerce, 1990, Counties and Equivalent Entities of the United States, Its Possessions, and Associated Areas, FIPS 6-3, Washington, DC, National Institute of Standards and Technology
Place_Keyword: Monroe County
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus: USGS Geographic Names Information System
Place_Keyword: Everglades National Park
Place_Keyword: Florida Bay
Place_Keyword: Barnes Key
Place_Keyword: Rabbit Key
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus: none
Place_Keyword: Central Everglades
Place_Keyword: Florida Keys
Taxonomy:
Keywords/Taxon:
Taxonomic_Keyword_Thesaurus: none
Taxonomic_Keywords: plants
Taxonomic_Keywords: vegetation
Taxonomic_System:
Classification_System/Authority:
Classification_System_Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator:
U.S. Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service (ARS)

U.S. Department of Agriculture - Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Department of the Interior - U.S. Geological Survey Department of Commerce - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Smithsonian Institution - National Museum of Natural History (NMNH)

Publication_Date: 2000
Title: Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS)
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: Database
Other_Citation_Details:
Retrieved from the Integrated Taxonomic Information System on-line database, <http://www.itis.gov>.
Online_Linkage: <http://www.itis.gov>
Classification_System/Authority:
Classification_System_Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator:
Tsuda, Roy T.

Abbott, Isabella A.

Publication_Date: 1985
Title: Collection, handling, preservation, and logistics
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: report
Other_Citation_Details:
in Ecological Field Methods: Microalgae. Handbook of Phycological Methods
Classification_System/Authority:
Classification_System_Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator: Taylor, William Randolph
Publication_Date: 1960
Title:
Marine Algae of the Eastern Tropical and Subtropical Coasts fo the Americas
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: book
Publication_Information:
Publication_Place: Ann Arbor, MI
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
Classification_System/Authority:
Classification_System_Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator:
Abbott, Isabella A.

Dawson, E. Y.

Publication_Date: 1978
Title: How to Know the Seaweeds
Edition: 2nd
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: book
Publication_Information:
Publication_Place: Dubuque, IA
Publisher: Wm. C. Brown Co. Publishers
Classification_System/Authority:
Classification_System_Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator: Dawson, E. Yale
Publication_Date: 1966
Title: Marine Botany: An Introduction
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: book
Publication_Information:
Publication_Place: New York, NY
Publisher: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston
Classification_System/Authority:
Classification_System_Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator:
Boyd, Harold C.

Wynne, Michael J.

Publication_Date: 1985
Title: Introduction to the Algae
Edition: 2nd
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: book
Publication_Information:
Publication_Place: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall Inc.
Taxonomic_Procedures:
The procedures that are used mimic the techniques that the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History has used for many years. A link to these procedures can be found at <http://www.nmnh.si.edu/botany/projects/algae/prestech.htm>

To date, most of the collection is herbarium mounts which follow standard herbarium protocols for mounting and storing and labeling, i.e. labels have the following info: 1. Geographic area of collection (i.e. name of island, county, state) 2. Binomial, including author(s) 3. Where collected, including latitude, and longitude if possible 4. Depth, substratum type, etc., including how collected (SCUBA, dredge, submersible, etc.) 5. Specific ecological information 6. Collector; date of collection 7. Collector's field number for specimen or collection 8. Person who identified the specimen

Mounts are dried and fixed to herbarium paper and stored in museum cabinets with insect prevention chemicals inside.

Our continued work in the field will begin to include some preserved specimens and these will also follow the Smithsonian protocols.

Taxonomic_Completeness: unknown
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Kingdom
Taxon_Rank_Value: Plantae
Applicable_Common_Name: plants
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Subkingdom
Taxon_Rank_Value: Tracheobionta
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Division
Taxon_Rank_Value: Magnoliophyta
Applicable_Common_Name: angiosprems
Applicable_Common_Name: flowering plants
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Class
Taxon_Rank_Value: Liliopsida
Applicable_Common_Name: monocotyledons
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Subclass
Taxon_Rank_Value: Alismatidae
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Order
Taxon_Rank_Value: Hydrocharitales
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Family
Taxon_Rank_Value: Hydrocharitaceae
Applicable_Common_Name: frog's bit
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Genus
Taxon_Rank_Value: Thalassia
Applicable_Common_Name: thalassia
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Species
Taxon_Rank_Value: Thalsaia testudinum
Applicable_Common_Name: turtlegrass
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Division
Taxon_Rank_Value: Rhodophycota
Applicable_Common_Name: red algae
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Class
Taxon_Rank_Value: Rhodophyceae
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Subclass
Taxon_Rank_Value: Florideophycideae
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Order
Taxon_Rank_Value: Ceramiales
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Family
Taxon_Rank_Value: Rhodomelaceae
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Genus
Taxon_Rank_Value: Chondria
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Species
Taxon_Rank_Value: Chondria floridana
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Genus
Taxon_Rank_Value: Laurencia
Taxonomic_Classification:
Taxon_Rank_Name: Genus
Taxon_Rank_Value: Polysiphonia
Access_Constraints: none
Use_Constraints:
Any data are subject to change and are not citeable until reviewed and approved for official publication.
Point_of_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Lynn Brewster-Wingard
Contact_Organization: U.S. Geological Survey
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing address
Address: 926A National Center
City: Reston
State_or_Province: VA
Postal_Code: 20192
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 703 648-5352
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 703 648-6953
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: lwingard@usgs.gov
Browse_Graphic:
Browse_Graphic_File_Name: <https://sofia.usgs.gov/projects/workplans03/wingardM-map.jpg>
Browse_Graphic_File_Description:
Approximate area of study developed from USGS ortho-photomap (1972) showing core locations at Barnes (Bar) and Rabbit Keys (RK).
Browse_Graphic_File_Type: JPEG
Data_Set_Credit:
Other project personnel include Charles Holmes, Jim Murray, and Marci Marot.
Cross_Reference:
Citation_Information:
Originator:
Brewster-Wingard, G. Lynn

Ishman, S. E.; Edwards, L. E.; Willard, D. A.

Publication_Date: 1996
Title:
Preliminary Report on the Distribution of Modern Fauna and Flora at Selected Sites in North-central and North-eastern Florida Bay
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: report
Series_Information:
Series_Name: USGS Open-File Report
Issue_Identification: 96-0732
Publication_Information:
Publication_Place: Reston, VA
Publisher: U.S. Geological Survey
Online_Linkage: <http://pubs.usgs.gov/pdf/of/ofr96732.html>

Data_Quality_Information:
Logical_Consistency_Report:
Several different remote sensing techniques used to map the location of seagrass habitats have demonstrated the successful use of visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Analysis of remote sensing data from multiple sustems will be applied in this study to determine the ideal wavelengths and spatial resolution necessary to detect and monitor the health of seagrass beds.
Completeness_Report:
The sensors to be tested will include Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Quickbird high resolution sensor, and large-scale aerial photography. If available, experimental data from NASAís EO-1 HYPERION hyperspectral sensor and the multispectral Advanced Land Imager (ALI) will also be acquired and compared.

All submerged aquatic vegetation in the test areas will be mapped using GPS units.

Lineage:
Methodology:
Methodology_Type: Lab
Methodology_Description:
Current remote sensing data aquired for this area will used to test different platforms, to determine detection limits, and to isolate distinct signals for different types of vegetation.

A second task is to examine the relationship between seagrass and environmental factors over a time-scale of years and decades by using sediment cores from two known and well-documented areas of seagrass die-off, Barnes Key and Rabbit Key. These cores preserve a record of the substrate, salinity, nutrient supply, and the fauna and flora present at a site. By examining the link between environmental factors and seagrass over an extended period, we can test hypotheses about the causes of seagrass die-off. These hypotheses include 1) changes in salinity; 2) changes in light availability; 3) changes in water temperature; 4) nutrient availability; 5) disease; and 6) increases in atmospheric dust (aerosols). These data will be compiled with the analysis of historical aerial photos and remote sensing data (task 1) to determine 1) if any distinctive patterns in the sequence of events can be detected in the cores, the aerial photos, and or the remote sensing data, and 2) in hindsight, did the aerial photographs and/or remote sensing data pick up some signal to the beginning of the stressors that could be used as a predictive tool to monitor seagrass beds for future problems.

Methodology:
Methodology_Type: Field
Methodology_Description:
Ground truth data collection will be performed to coincide as closely as possible with imagery collection. Ground truth data consists of date/time, water temperature, water depth, tidal fluctuations, type of subaquatic vegetation, size and density of seagrass beds and substrate for individual seagrass beds within the study area. Turbidity and chlorophyll levels in the water will be measured. Ground control data will include spectral signatures of seagrass habitats acquired through a portable spectrometer. All ground truth data will be linked to geographic reference coordinates developed from global positioning systems (GPS) receivers. The secondary objective of this task is to collect information on seasonal changes in SAV and responses to environmental variables, such as salinity, water temperature, nutrients, etc. These data will provide the background information for interpreting the changes seen in the historical data (remote sensing, aerial photographs, and core data) by providing insights into the causes of changes in SAV distribution.

A 10-15 km2 portion of Florida Bay that encompasses areas affected by the 1987 and 1999 die-offs will be analyzed for this pilot study. Current remote sensing data acquired for this area will be used to test different platforms, to determine detection limits, and to isolate distinct signals for different types of vegetation. Once ground-truthing and remote sensing data analysis is completed, archived remote sensing data can then be used to examine the sequences of events leading up to the die-offs. Sediment cores provide a long-term perspective on changes in nutrient geochemistry, substrate, water chemistry (salinity, temperature, oxygen), and changes in the biota.

Process_Step:
Process_Description:
Evaluation of remote sensing methods for seagrass detection by developing a multiple sensor approach for monitoring the spatial extent and health of seagrasses in the study area.

We will determine the ideal sensor bands and spatial resolution for detecting subaquatic vegetation using the different platforms and sensor types. The proposed work consists of the acquisition of remote sensing imagery, aerial photographic interpretation, imagery classification, ground truth data collection and the comparison and evaluation of results.

Data from the selected remote sensing systems will be acquired for a specific time period in FY 2003. Preferably, all imagery will be collected on the same date/time to ensure environmental variables are constant for all images and will be closely correlated with field mapping. If this is not possible, due to tasking and weather limitations, the best possible combination of imagery and image dates will be acquired. These data sets include Landsat 7 ETM+, ASTER, Quickbird, Natural color, 1:12,000 scale aerial photography, historical photography and, if available, a test image of HYPERION hyperspectral data.

Digital image processing will be performed on the Landsat, ASTER, and Quickbird imagery using portable spectrometers and field observation data. Several processing and enhancement methods will be applied including, conversion from sensor radiance to absolute reflectance prior to processing. Images will be created based on spectral responses of seagrass, water and other environmental materials as well as statistical significance tests, where applicable. The goal of the image processing is to develop the best possible band combination and processing technique for each sensor for the purpose of mapping seagrass habitat in Florida Bay. Once processed, image classes, which correspond to those used in the aerial photography interpretation step, will be developed for each sensor used. Ancillary information will be compiled for the study area that will include the bathymetry, tidal range, water temperature, and salinity. These data layers will assist in the processing and evaluation of the satellite.

The aerial photography mapping protocol consists of stereoscopic photo interpretation, cartographic transfer, and digitization of seagrass habitat in accordance with previously used seagrass classification systems. Other important aspects of the protocol include the development of a classification system, validation with ground control data, quality control, and peer review. The information derived from the photography will subsequently be transferred using a Zoom Transfer Scope onto a stable medium overlaying USGS 1:12,000 scale quadrangle basemaps. Habitat classification done through the aerial photography interpretation will be stored as a geographic information system (GIS) data layer to be used for remote sensing correlation analysis. Historical photography will also be analyzed to evaluate spatial size and location related to historical die-off events. We will begin gathering these historical photographs in FY03, but interpretation will probably take place in FY04.

The resultant image classifications of each sensor system will be correlated against both the independent ground truth data and the aerial photography interpretation habitat classes for an assessment of accuracy. The different methodologies and image processing techniques will be evaluated based on their correlation with the habitat maps and ground truth data. The procedures will be documented and explained to show the comparison of sensor systems, band combinations, spatial resolution and correlation with ground truth.

Process_Date: 2004
Process_Step:
Process_Description:
Field mapping of subaquatic vegetation

Field mapping in the study area will start in FY 2003. Three to six test sites (at scales ranging from 1m up to a maximum of 90 m2) will be selected within the study area that represent different environments, habitats and water depths typical of the area. These sites will be selected based on preliminary field observations and examinations of historical and current aerial photographs.

Investigations at each test site will include the following: 1) All submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) within the test areas will be mapped using GPS units. The perimeter of the grass beds and any associated barren sections will be measured and documented. Over the course of this project these boundaries will serve as a baseline to determine any expansion or contraction of vegetation that may occur. 2) The SAV within the test area will be identified to species level and a permanent reference collection of samples established. After the initial identification and sampling process is complete, the plant biomass density will be measured and documented by using a grid system and counting plant stems and/ or shoots within a random sampling of the grid layout. 3) Portable spectrometer readings will be made over areas of different types of SAV to determine the spectral signatures associated with each type. These data will be critical in interpreting the remote sensing data. 4) Water quality measurements will be taken including; salinity, temperature, turbidity, chlorophyll content, PH, dissolved oxygen, ammonia, nitrates, nitrites, etc. at each test site. 5) Water depth, sediment depth, and substrate type will be documented at each measured site. 6) Selected test sites will be monitored on a regular basis (4-8 week intervals) in order to establish seasonal variability within the submerged plant communities. The increases and decreases in abundance of various groups of SAV and the phytoplankton densities within the water column can then be established.

Process_Date: Not complete
Process_Step:
Process_Description:
Historical perspective on the causes of seagrass die-off from sediment cores

In FY 2003 we will process two cores collected in June 2001 from Barnes Key and Rabbit Key. Sampling and analyses of cores will follow methods established by the Florida Bay Ecosystem History Project. Cores will be dated using 210-Pb geochronology. Faunal and floral assemblage analyses will be conducted on 2-cm segments of the cores from Barnes and Rabbit Key; these data will be interpreted using a large dataset on the biology and ecology of modern Florida Bay fauna and flora. The presence of seagrass-indicator species (primarily molluscs in FY 2003) will be quantified in down-core samples.

Process_Date: 2003
Process_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Lynn Brewster-Wingard
Contact_Organization: U.S. Geological Survey
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing address
Address: 926A National Center
City: Reston
State_or_Province: VA
Postal_Code: 20192
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 703 648-5352
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 703 648-6953
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: lwingard@usgs.gov

Spatial_Data_Organization_Information:
Indirect_Spatial_Reference: Florida Bay

Spatial_Reference_Information:
Horizontal_Coordinate_System_Definition:
Geographic:
Latitude_Resolution: 0.001
Longitude_Resolution: 0.001
Geographic_Coordinate_Units: Degrees, minutes, and decimal seconds
Geodetic_Model:
Horizontal_Datum_Name: North American Datum of 1983
Ellipsoid_Name: Geodetic Reference System 80
Semi-major_Axis: 6378137
Denominator_of_Flattening_Ratio: 298.257

Distribution_Information:
Distributor:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Heather S.Henkel
Contact_Organization: U.S. Geological Survey
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing address
Address: 600 Fourth St. South
City: St. Petersburg
State_or_Province: FL
Postal_Code: 33701
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 727 803-8747 ext 3028
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 727 803-2030
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: hhenkel@usgs.gov
Resource_Description: Ecosystem history of South Florida estuaries data
Distribution_Liability:
The field data contained in this database have not been reviewed for publication and therefore may contain inconsistencies or errors. The field measurements (such as salinity and temperature) were made on an variety of instruments over the years. Project personnel have made every attempt to calibrate and standardize the instruments and check the data, however, the field data should be considered preliminary. Also taxonomic names may not represent the most up to date usage, but are internally consistent.
Standard_Order_Process:
Digital_Form:
Digital_Transfer_Information:
Format_Name: MS Access
Format_Version_Number: unknown
Format_Specification: The Access database is available as a zipped file
Transfer_Size: 4.8
Digital_Transfer_Option:
Online_Option:
Computer_Contact_Information:
Network_Address:
Network_Resource_Name: <https://sofia.usgs.gov/exchange/flaecohist/>
Access_Instructions: The database may be downloaded from the SOFIA website
Fees: none

Metadata_Reference_Information:
Metadata_Date: 20070220
Metadata_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Heather Henkel
Contact_Organization: U.S. Geological Survey
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing and physical address
Address: 600 Fourth Street South
City: St. Petersburg
State_or_Province: FL
Postal_Code: 33701
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 727 803-8747 ext 3028
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 727 803-2030
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: sofia-metadata@usgs.gov
Metadata_Standard_Name:
Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata Part 1: Biological Data Profile
Metadata_Standard_Version: FGDC-STD-001.1-1999

This page is <https://sofia.usgs.gov/metadata/sflwww/monitor_sav_rs_fb_04.html>

U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, Center for Coastal Geology
Comments and suggestions? Contact: Heather Henkel - Webmaster
Generated by mp version 2.8.18 on Wed Feb 21 09:58:32 2007