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Empirical Studies in Support of a Pink Shrimp, Farfantepenaeus duorarum, Simulation Model for Florida Bay

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Frequently-anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title:
Empirical Studies in Support of a Pink Shrimp, Farfantepenaeus duorarum, Simulation Model for Florida Bay
Abstract:
A Tortugas/Florida Bay pink shrimp simulation model has been identified as a priority need in CERP by the South Florida Water Management District, NOAA, NPS and USGS. This model has been under development through the collaboration of a team of National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), USGS and University of Miami (UM) researchers since 1997. To date this project has been funded by NOAA’s Coastal Oceans Program, DOI’s Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative and by USGS base funds. The purpose of the model is to assist in designing and refining restoration alternatives by predicting their impact on production of pink shrimp in Florida Bay and on shrimp recruitment from Florida Bay to the Tortugas fishery.

A series of monitoring or empirical studies either have been completed or are ongoing. The NMFS continues to monitor Tortugas pink shrimp harvest and develop the simulation model and has completed pink shrimp salinity/temperature tolerance experiments. USGS is continuing to monitor pink shrimp distribution and abundance in relation to environmental conditions and habitat in Florida Bay and to measure water flow in order to estimate postlarval transport within the Bay. With UM a critical collaborative study to identify and quantify the seasonality and magnitude of pathways of postlarval immigration to Florida Bay is continuing. Statistical studies of these and other data are ongoing relating pink shrimp to salinity, temperature and habitat in Florida Bay.

Supplemental_Information:
Hydrology data from this project have been incorporated into the South Florida Hydrology Database.
  1. How should this data set be cited?

    Michael B. Robblee Clinton Hittle, 2009, Empirical Studies in Support of a Pink Shrimp, Farfantepenaeus duorarum, Simulation Model for Florida Bay.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?

    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -81.25
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -80.375
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 25.25
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 24.75
    Description_of_Geographic_Extent: Florida Bay

  3. What does it look like?

    <https://sofia.usgs.gov/exchange/zucker_woods_patino/stations_map_pinkshrimp.gif> (GIF)
    location of the sampling sites

  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?

    Beginning_Date: Oct-1999
    Ending_Date: 30-Sep-2004
    Currentness_Reference: ground condition

  5. What is the general form of this data set?

    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: project

  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?

    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?

      Indirect_Spatial_Reference: Florida Bay
      This is a Point data set. It contains the following vector data types (SDTS terminology):
      • Point (6)

    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?

      Horizontal positions are specified in geographic coordinates, that is, latitude and longitude. Latitudes are given to the nearest 1. Longitudes are given to the nearest 1. Latitude and longitude values are specified in Degrees, minutes, and decimal seconds.

      The horizontal datum used is North American Datum of 1983.
      The ellipsoid used is Geodetic Reference System 80.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378137.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/298.257.

  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?

    Entity_and_Attribute_Overview:
    Data collected at each site included salinity, temperature, and water level. In addition, discharge and tidal discharge were collected at four sites
    Entity_and_Attribute_Detail_Citation: USGS personnel

  8. What biological taxa does this data set concern?

    Taxonomy:
    Keywords/Taxon:
    Taxonomic_Keyword_Thesaurus: none
    Taxonomic_Keywords: animals
    Taxonomic_Keywords: single species
    Taxonomic_Keywords: shrimp
    Taxonomic_System:
    Classification_System/Authority:
    Classification_System_Citation:
    Citation_Information:
    Originator:
    U.S. Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service (ARS)

    U.S. Department of Agriculture - Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Department of the Interior - U.S. Geological Survey Department of Commerce - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Smithsonian Institution - National Museum of Natural History (NMNH)

    Publication_Date: 2000
    Title: Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS)
    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: Database
    Other_Citation_Details:
    Retrieved from the Integrated Taxonomic Information System on-line database, <http://www.itis.gov>.
    Online_Linkage: <http://www.itis.gov>
    Taxonomic_Procedures:
    All fish and pink shrimp caught in throw-trap collections in Johnson Key Basin will be sorted in the laboratory and identified to species and enumerated. Pink shrimp postlarvae caught in channel nets at specific locations in Florida Bay will be sorted from the sample, identified, and preserved in 95% ethanol.
    General_Taxonomic_Coverage: shrimp are identified to species
    Taxonomic_Classification:
    Taxon_Rank_Name: Kingdom
    Taxon_Rank_Value: Animalia
    Applicable_Common_Name: animals
    Taxonomic_Classification:
    Taxon_Rank_Name: Phylum
    Taxon_Rank_Value: Arthropoda
    Applicable_Common_Name: arthropods
    Taxonomic_Classification:
    Taxon_Rank_Name: Subphylum
    Taxon_Rank_Value: Crustacea
    Applicable_Common_Name: crustaceans
    Taxonomic_Classification:
    Taxon_Rank_Name: Class
    Taxon_Rank_Value: Malacostraca
    Taxonomic_Classification:
    Taxon_Rank_Name: Subclass
    Taxon_Rank_Value: Eumalacostraca
    Taxonomic_Classification:
    Taxon_Rank_Name: Superorder
    Taxon_Rank_Value: Eucarida
    Applicable_Common_Name: lagosta
    Taxonomic_Classification:
    Taxon_Rank_Name: Order
    Taxon_Rank_Value: Decapoda
    Applicable_Common_Name: crabs
    Applicable_Common_Name: caryfishes
    Applicable_Common_Name: lobsters
    Applicable_Common_Name: prawns
    Applicable_Common_Name: shrimp
    Taxonomic_Classification:
    Taxon_Rank_Name: Suborder
    Taxon_Rank_Value: Dendrobranchiata
    Taxonomic_Classification:
    Taxon_Rank_Name: Family
    Taxon_Rank_Value: Penaeidae
    Applicable_Common_Name: penaeid shrimps
    Taxonomic_Classification:
    Taxon_Rank_Name: Genus
    Taxon_Rank_Value: Farfantepenaeus
    Taxonomic_Classification:
    Taxon_Rank_Name: Species
    Taxon_Rank_Value: Farfantepenaeus duorarum
    Applicable_Common_Name: pink shrimp


Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)

    • Michael B. Robblee

  2. Who also contributed to the data set?

    Project personnel include Andre Daniels, Vin DiFrenna, Joel Conlin, George Gallegos, Joan Browder, Maria Criales, and Tom Jackson

  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?

    Michael Robblee
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Everglades National Park

    40001 State Road 9336
    Homestead, FL 33034
    USA

    305 242-7832 (voice)
    305 242-7836 (FAX)
    mike_robblee@usgs.gov


Why was the data set created?

Florida Bay lies downstream of the Everglades ecosystem. Perceived deterioration of the Everglades over the last century - and Florida Bay since the mid-1980’s - is generally viewed as linked to changes in freshwater flow and water quality associated with water management in South Florida. A pink shrimp simulation model is being developed to assist in designing and refining restoration alternatives by predicting their impact on production of pink shrimp in Florida Bay and on shrimp recruitment from Florida Bay to the Tortugas fishery.

The pink shrimp is a good indicator of the health and productivity of the Bay. The effect of salinity and temperature on pink shrimp growth and survivorship and of habitat on juvenile density provide a basis for predicting the abundance of pink shrimp juveniles in Florida Bay and thus the magnitude of recruitment to the Tortugas fishery. A landscape model is needed to express pink shrimp performance measures as functions of spatially complex factors acting across the Bay. Florida Bay is a complex shallow water ecosystem with distinct zones of different physical and biological characteristics (Fourqurean and Robblee 1999) that differ in their potential to support pink shrimp. The influence of upstream water management on pink shrimp recruitment from Florida Bay is expected to express itself principally through changes in salinity and seagrass habitat associated with changes in freshwater inflow. Predictions of the effect of these changes on the Bay’s productive capacity require consideration not only of the resulting salinity and seagrass changes but also the resulting change in the area of overlap of these factors favorable to the pink shrimp (Browder and Moore 1981; Browder 1991). Critical long-term databases exist for pink shrimp that are suitable for developing empirical relationships and baselines.


How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?

  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?

    Date: Unknown (process 1 of 4)
    Critical long-term databases exist for pink shrimp that are suitable for developing empirical relationships and baselines. NOAA has collected and maintained catch and effort data on this fishery since 1960. The National Park Service and USGS have monitored juvenile shrimp abundance in relation to physical conditions of salinity and temperature and seagrass habitat, principally in western Florida Bay, since 1981.

    Analysis of this data set will provide the pink shrimp simulation model with seasonal timing, size frequency data as well as abundance and size of juvenile pink shrimp in relation to bank, basin and near-key habitats seagrass cover. Specific objectives include:

    1. Quantify density and size of juvenile pink shrimp in relation to bank, basin and near-key habitat in Johnson Key Basin, western Florida Bay. 2. Implement Braun Blanquet cover estimation as a means of associating pink shrimp abundance to seagrass and algal habitat. 3. Evaluate the existing benthic database in order to develop a monitoring protocol for assessing juvenile pink shrimp abundance and distribution in Florida Bay in relation to changes in salinity.

    Using established methods nine stations (3 bank, 3 basin, 3 near-key habitat) in Johnson Key Basin will be sampled on a six-week interval for a total of 9 collections during FY2003. A one m2 throw-trap is used to quantitatively collect seagrass associated fish and invertebrates including the pink shrimp. Each throw-trap is swept three times to remove organisms. Four throw-trap samples are collected at each station as well as a suite of environmental and habitat variables. Previously habitat estimates have been made based on biomass estimates of seagrass and algae associated with throw-trap collections. Braun Blanquet is a categorical cover estimate technique currently used in seagrass monitoring programs in Florida Bay and the Florida Keys. In the laboratory samples will be sorted, all fish and shrimp (caridean and pink shrimp) will be identified to species and enumerated. Data will be stored in the Everglades National Park Oracle Database.

    Person who carried out this activity:

    Michael Robblee
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Everglades National Park

    40001 State Road 9336
    Homestead, FL 33034
    USA

    305 242-7832 (voice)
    305 242-7836 (FAX)
    mike_robblee@usgs.gov

    Date: Unknown (process 2 of 4)
    The timing, distribution and magnitude of postlarval shrimp immigration to Florida Bay were identified as critical information needs required for development of the pink shrimp simulation model. To address these needs a field study is ongoing to estimate and compare monthly postlarval immigration to Florida Bay through six defined channels: two from the Gulf of Mexico (Sandy Key, Middle Ground) into western Florida Bay, two from the Atlantic Ocean (Whale Harbor Channel, Indian Key Channel) through the Florida Keys into southwestern and central Florida Bay, and two interior channels that connect Florida Bay sub basins, Conchie Channel near Flamingo in western Florida Bay and Panhandle Key Cut in south central Florida Bay. Sampling postlarval pink shrimp at these six stations involves the closely coordinated efforts of NOAA, responsible for sampling the Florida Keys stations, and UM and USGS personnel with responsibility for sampling the western Florida Bay stations. Specific objectives include:

    1. Quantify the seasonality and magnitude of postlarval pink shrimp immigration to Florida Bay. 2. Compare timing and magnitude of postlarval pink shrimp immigration from the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. 3. Assess accessibility of inner Florida Bay to postlarval pink shrimp by comparing the timing and magnitude of Gulf of Mexico stations to Conchie Channel; of Atlantic Ocean stations to Panhandle Key Cut. 4. Assess sampling protocols by comparing postlarvae catch in relation to tidal phase and depth. 5. Participate in the development of a transport module for the pink shrimp simulation model.

    Post larval pink shrimp sampling was initiated in January 2000. Channel nets (0.75 m2 opening, 1-mm mesh net, 500-micron mesh in the cod end) are used. The nets are attached to fixed moorings in the evening and samples are collected the following morning having passively collected postlarvae over night. The top of the channel net is set at .5 meter deep. At present paired channel nets sample six channels on two nights of the new moon; thus, four samples are obtained from each site each month for a total of 24. Pink shrimp postlarvae are sorted from the sample, identified, and preserved in 95% ethanol. The raw catch in each sample is standardized to density per 1,000 m3 of water filtered. Mean monthly density is calculated as the average over the two sampling nights. Densities are tested for normality and homogeneity of variance. Two experiments will be conducted to evaluate the current sampling methods. The present method of drifting the channel nets over night will be evaluated by sampling on a two-hour interval with the object of understanding when post larvae are most abundant. A second experiment will evaluate the relationship of depth and postlarval pink shrimp abundance by comparing catch in nets drifted at the surface, .5 meter and 1 meter. Experimental results will be used to aid in interpretation of catches or alternatively to modify sampling protocols.

    Person who carried out this activity:

    Michael Robblee
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Everglades National Park

    40001 State Road 9336
    Homestead, FL 33034
    USA

    305 242-7832 (voice)
    305 242-7836 (FAX)
    mike_robblee@usgs.gov

    Date: 2004 (process 3 of 4)
    In October of 2001, a study began to determine the volume transport at each of the six stations where postlarvae are being sampled. Acoustic Doppler technology has been installed at the four defined channels connecting Florida Bay with the Gulf of Mexico (Sandy, Middle Ground) and the Atlantic Ocean (Whale Harbor, Indian Key) and the two interior channels Conchie, Panhandle) that connect to Florida Bay interior sub basins where monthly postlarval sampling occurs. These estimates of volume transport facilitate the direct comparison of the six stations being sampled for postlarvae and are essential to an assessment of the relative importance of the two known pathways of larval immigration into Florida Bay - west from the Gulf of Mexico and from the Atlantic Ocean through passages in the Florida Keys. These continuous measurements are also essential in developing a larval transport module for the pink shrimp simulation model. A significant additional benefit of the data being collected is that it will be very useful in the development of a Florida Bay circulation model, a high priority of CERP. Specific objectives include:

    1. Estimate volume transport in the six channels being sampled for postlarvae. 2. Construct rating curves at each station under a variety of tidal flow conditions in order to improve volume transport estimates. 3. Compare volume transport among the six stations in a comparison of postlarval immigration into Florida Bay. 4. Participate in the development of a transport module for the pink shrimp simulation model.

    Measurements of flow, stage, and salinity will continue in FY 2003 in the six channels being sampled for post larvae. In collaboration with Dr. Joan Browder of NOAA these data will be applied to the construction of the larval transport module for the pink shrimp simulation module. Methods developed to date and in other studies will continue to be employed. Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meters (ADVM) have been installed at the instrumented sites and are used to measure continuous (15- minute) water velocity. A boat-mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) is used to calculate total discharge along a transect of the channels during inspections. The ADCP also measures water depth, boat speed, and direction of boat movement using acoustic reflections from the streambed. Discharge and flow direction are both calculated from data collected with the ADCP. The mean velocity for the creek section is calculated by dividing the total discharge measured with the ADCP by the cross-sectional area corresponding to the water level at the time of the discharge measurement. The cross-sectional area is computed by using site-specific stage-area ratings. A velocity rating between the mean ADCP velocity and the in situ ADVM velocity is calculated by regression analysis. This rating equation is then used to calculate continous discharge using the velocity data. Stage measurements are made acoustically and through water pressure in the ADVM and Salinity instrumentation respectively. Stage is used to define the cross-sectional area over which flow measurements are made, and are used in the regression analysis between flow and stage. Salinity measured near the surface and bottom of each channel to quantify the vertical stratification present at each site, which could be detrimental to acoustic signals. Additionally, temperature is measured to monitor possible vertical temperature gradients that could be detrimental to acoustic signals and as a necessary parameter to calculate salinity from conductivity.

    Person who carried out this activity:

    Mark Zucker
    U.S. Geological Survey
    3110 SW 9th Ave.
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
    USA

    954 377-5952 (voice)
    954 377-5901 (FAX)
    mzucker@usgs.gov

    Date: 2001 (process 4 of 4)
    In October of 2001, a study began to determine the volume transport at each of the six stations where postlarvae are being sampled. Acoustic Doppler technology was been installed at the four defined channels connecting Florida Bay with the Gulf of Mexico (Sandy, Middle Ground) and the Atlantic Ocean (Whale Harbor, Indian Key) and the two interior channels Conchie, Panhandle) that connect to Florida Bay interior sub basins where monthly postlarval sampling occurs.

    Field data collection of water level, temperature, salinity, and discharge: Data collected at instrumented sites included continuous (15-minute or hourly) measurements of water level, water velocity, salinity/specific conductance, temperature, and periodic measurements of discharge for index velocity calibrations. More information on index velocity techniques is discussed in Hittle and others (2001) and Morlock and others (2002), and Ruhl and others (2005). Non-transmitting sites are routinely serviced and field data is manually uploaded to the USGS database.

    Boat mounted acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to measure discharge at the estuarine monitoring stations. The ADCP uses the Doppler shift in returned acoustic signals reflected by particles suspended in the water to determine the velocity of moving water (Simpson 2002 and Oberg and others 2005). The ADCP also has the capability to measure water depth, flow direction, and speed of the boat based on acoustic reflections from the streambed. Discharge and flow direction were both calculated from information provided by the ADCP and computer software. The mean water velocity was calculated by dividing the total measured discharge by the cross-sectional area corresponding to the water level at the time of measurement (Sauer 2002 and Ruhl and others 2005). Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) and acoustic Doppler velocity meter (ADVM) systems were used to measure continuous water velocity. The velocity measured by the ADVM systems represents an "index" of the mean water velocity. The index velocity is a measured velocity at the instrumented sites that can be used to compute the mean channel velocity.

    A boat-mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was used to calculate total discharge along a transect of the channels during inspections. The ADCP also measured water depth, boat speed, and direction of boat movement using acoustic reflections from the streambed. Discharge and flow direction were both calculated from data collected with the ADCP. The mean velocity for the creek section was calculated by dividing the total discharge measured with the ADCP by the cross-sectional area corresponding to the water level at the time of the discharge measurement. The cross-sectional area was computed by using site-specific stage-area ratings. A velocity rating between the mean ADCP velocity and the in situ ADVM velocity was calculated by regression analysis. This rating equation was then used to calculate continous discharge using the velocity data. Water level data were used to determine water depth and to calculate the stage-dependent cross-sectional area. Water level data were collected an incremental shaft encoder equipped with a pulley, stainless-steel tape, weight, and float inside an 8 in. polyvinyl chloride pipe stilling well (Sauer 2002), pressure sensors, or acoustic transducers. Corrections to water level data followed USGS quality assurance quality control protocols (Rantz and others 1982 and Sauer 2002).

    Salinity was measured near mid-depth help determine the presence of freshwater flow and to examine potential effects on the acoustic signals caused by salinity stratification. Continuous salinity measurements are important for describing the seasonal patterns of freshwater flow (wet/dry season) and for identifying bi-directional flow. Elevations of the continuous monitors are available upon request. Temperature was measured to monitor possible vertical gradients that also could affect acoustic signals. Due to biological fouling and electronic drift, the continuous monitor requires routine cleaning and calibration to maintain data quality. During the period of record, continuous monitors were calibrated during site visits to ambient conditions using a reference probe (USGS National Field Manual). Ambient salinity conditions were measured with a portable reference probe that was calibrated and or verified against a range of laboratory specific conductance standards. Reference temperature probes are verified against a NIST thermometer prior to field trips. When in situ temperature measurements differed by more than 0.2 deg. C when compared to the reference temperature probe, the in situ probe was replaced.

    Person who carried out this activity:

    Mark Zucker
    U.S. Geological Survey
    3110 SW 9th Ave.
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
    USA

    954 377-5952 (voice)
    954 377-5901 (FAX)
    mzucker@usgs.gov

  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?

    Hittle, Clinton Patino, Eduardo; Zucker, Mark, 2001, Freshwater flow from estuarine creeks into northeastern Florida Bay: USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4164, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: accessed as of 5/23/2011
    Rantz, S. E and others, 1982, Measurement and computation of streamflow Volume 1: measurement of stage and discharge: USGS Water Supply Paper 2175, vol. 1, U.S. Geological Survey, unknown.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: accessed as of 5/23/2011
    Sauer, Vernon B., 2002, Standards for the analysis and processing of surface-water data and information using electronic methods: USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4044, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: accessed as of 5/23/2011
    Wagner, R. J. Boulger, Jr, R. W.; Oblinge, 2006, Guidelines and standard procedures for continuous water-quality monitors: station operation, record computation, and data reporting: USGS Techniques and Methods 1-D3, U.S. Geological Survey, unknown.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details:
    supersedes Water-Investigations Report 00-4252

    accessed as of 5/25/2011

    Oberg, K. A. Morlock, S. E.; Caldwell, W, 2005, Quality-assurance plan for discharge measurements using acoustic Doppler current profilers: USGS Scientific Investigations Report 2005-5183, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details:
    in cooperation with the U. S. Amy Corps of Engineers, Detroit District

    accessed as of 5/23/2011

    Simpson, M. R., 2002, Discharge measurements using a broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler: USGS Open-File Report 01-01, U.S. Geological Survey, Sacramento, CA.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: accessed as of 5/23/2011
    Ruhl, C. A. Simpson, M. R., 2005, Computation of discharge using the index-velocity method in tidally affected areas: USGS Scientific Investigations Report 2005-5004, U.S. Geological Survey, Sacramento, CA.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details:
    Prepared in cooperation with the Interagency Ecological Program

    available online only; accessed as of 5/23/2011

    Fourqurean, J. W. Robblee, M. B., 1999, Florida Bay: a history of recent ecological changes: Estuaries v. 22, n.2B, Springer New York, New York.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: accessed as of 5/23/2011
    Browder, J. A., 1985, Relationship between pink shrimp production on the Tortugas grounds and water flow patterns in the Florida Everglades: Bulletin of Marine Science v. 37, n. 3, p. 839-856, University of Florida Press, Coral Gables, FL.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details:
    accessed as of 5/24/2011

    The full text is available as a free download

    Browder, J. A. Restrepo, V. R.; Rice, J. K, 1999, Environmental influences on potential recruitment of pink shrimp, Farfantepenaeus duoraram, from Florida Bay nursery grounds: Estuaries v. 22, n. 2B, p. 484-499, Springer New York, New York, New York.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: accessed as of 5/24/2011
    Browder, J. A. Moore, D., 1981, A new approach to determining the quantative relationship between fishery production and the flow of fresh water to estuaries: Proceedings, National Symposium on Freshwater Inflow to Estuaries Vol. 1, FWS/OBS-81/04, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, DC.

    Other_Citation_Details: R. Cross and D. Williams, editors
    Browder, J. A., 1991, Watershed management and the importance of freshwater flow to estuaries: Proceedings, Tampa Bay Area Scientific Information Symposium none, unknown, Tampa, FL.

    Other_Citation_Details: S. F. Treat and P. A. Clark, editors
    Office of Surface Water, 2006, U.S. Geological Survey Office of Surface Water Technical Memorandum No. 2006.01: USGS Office of Surface Water Technical Memorandum 2006.01, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: accessed as of 5/23/2011
    U.S. Geological Survey, 2004, National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (TWRI Book 9) Cahpter A3: Cleaning of equipment for water sampling: Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations Book 9, chapter A3, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: accessed as of 11/3/2010
    Morlock, S. E. Nguyen, H. T.; Ross, J. H., 2002, Feasibility of acoustic Doppler velocity meters for the production of discharge records from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations: USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4018, U.S. Geological Survey, Indianapolis, IN.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: accessed as of 5/23/2011


How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?

  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?

  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?

  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?

    Salinity, temperature, and water level were collected for all stations. In addition discharge and tidal discharge were collected at Indian Key Channel, Middle Gounds, Sandy Key Channel, and Whale Harbor. Data for Indian Key Channel, and Whale Harbor were collected from 2001 to 2004. Data for Conchie Channel, Middle Grounds, Panhandle Cut, and Sandy Key Channel were collected from 2002 to 2004.

  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?

    not available


How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?

Access_Constraints: none
Use_Constraints:
None. These data have been reviewed and approved for publication. Acknowledgement of the USGS in products derived from these data will be appreciated.

  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)

    Heather S. Henkel
    U.S. Geological Survey
    600 Fourth St. South
    St. Petersburg, FL 33701
    USA

    727 803-8747 ext 3028 (voice)
    727 803-2030 (FAX)
    hhenkel@usgs.gov

  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?

    South Florida Hydrology Database

  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?

    The data have no explicit or implied guarantees.

  4. How can I download or order the data?

    • Availability in digital form:

      Data format: Data for the stations with selectable variables, time frame, output format, and output organization in format ASCII comma-separated values (.csv) or tab-delimited text files
      Network links: <https://sofia.usgs.gov/exchange/zucker_woods_patino/index.php>

    • Cost to order the data: none


Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 30-May-2011
Metadata author:
Heather Henkel
U.S. Geological Survey
600 Fourth Street South
St. Petersburg, FL 33701
USA

727 803-8747 ext 3028 (voice)
727 803-2030 (FAX)
sofia-metadata@usgs.gov

Metadata standard:
Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata Part 1: Biological Data Profile (FGDC-STD-001.1-1999)


This page is <https://sofia.usgs.gov/metadata/sflwww/robblee_shrimp.faq.html>

U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
Comments and suggestions? Contact: Heather Henkel - Webmaster
Generated by mp version 2.8.18 on Mon May 30 11:18:47 2011