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Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK) Team Members

Photo of Dr. Steve Corn Dr. Steve Corn
USGS, Principal Investigator, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center
Dr. Corn received his Ph.D. in 1982 from Colorado State University where his dissertation focused on selection pressures affecting a dorsal color polymorphism in leopard frogs (Rana pipiens). He has been working on amphibians and amphibian decline since 1980. His current research projects include status and trends of Rocky Mountain amphibians, with investigations into the effects of global change; long-term monitoring of populations; effects of UV-B on amphibians; and geographic genetic variation in the Bufo boreas species complex. Steve has been involved with the planning and implementation of the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative since 1998 and served at temporary detail as the National Coordinator for ARMI at USGS headquarters in Reston, Virginia in 2002. He is an editor for Herpetological Conservation, a member of the Species Survival Commission of the World Conservation Union (IUCN), and is an affiliate faculty for Idaho State University and theUniversity of Montana.
Photo of Blake Hossack Blake Hossack
USGS, Research Zoologist, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center
Mr. Hossack joined the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute / Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center in September 2000. He has coordinated field activities and data management for the Rocky Mountain region of the USGS Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative since May 1999. Much of his current research is focused on the effects of several recent wildfires in Glacier National Park on amphibians and their habitats. Other projects include capture-recapture and egg mass counts to track population sizes; synergistic effects of physiological stress, body condition, and disease on amphibian populations; describing the biodiversity of wetland invertebrates in Glacier NP; and developing digital tools for monitoring calling frogs. He completed his master's degree in Wildlife Biology from the University of Idaho following a bachelor's degree in Wildlife Biology from the University of Montana. Blake is currently pursuing his Ph.D. at the University of Montana.

Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) Team Members

Photo of Dr. Erin Muths Dr. Erin Muths
USGS, Principal Investigator, Fort Collins Science Center
Dr. Muths received her Ph.D. from the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia where her dissertation focused on the physiological ecology of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus). She has been working on amphibians and amphibian decline at the Fort Collins Science Center since 1995. Her current research projects include status and trends of Rocky Mountain amphibians with investigations into habitat use in boreal toads and woodfrogs using radio-telemetry; long-term monitoring of populations; amphibian health; an investigation of the prevalence of the amphibian chytrid fungus and its relation to boreal toad populations along the great divide transect, and methods development. Erin served a temporary detail as the National Coordinator for ARMI at USGS headquarters in Reston, Virginia in 2003. She is an associate editor for Herpetological Conservation and Biology and Animal Conservation, a member of the boreal toad recovery team (Colorado Division of Wildlife) and an affiliate faculty member for Colorado State University.
Photo of Dr. Rick Scherer Rick Scherer
Colorado State University / USGS, Fort Collins Science Center, student contractor.

Mr. Scherer joined the Fort Collins Science Center as a volunteer in 1998. After working as a technician, he completed his master’s degree at CSU in 2006. His thesis examined effects of the amphibian chytrid fungus on boreal toad survival using capture-recapture, and an information-theoretic approach to population modeling. He is currently completing his Ph.D. at CSU. His dissertation focuses on the spatial distribution of amphibians in the Kawuneeche Valley of Rocky Mountain National Park.

Other Team Members

Photo of Deb Patla Deb Patla
Collaborator - Northern Rockies Conservation Cooperative
Ms. Patla has conducted amphibian surveys, monitoring, and research in the Yellowstone-Teton area since 1993. She received a Master's degree from Idaho State University for research on the effects of habitat modification and fragmentation on a population of Columbia spotted frogs in Yellowstone National Park, a population that she continues to monitor under ARMI. Deb designs and coordinates surveys and conducts field work for the ARMI-GYE project, based out of her home office near Moran, Wyoming. Over the last several years, she has worked with Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks, the National Elk Refuge, the Bridger-Teton National Forest, and other agencies to provide information on amphibian occurrence, the potential effects of proposed land management projects, and conservation measures.
Photo of Dr. Chuck Peterson Dr. Chuck Peterson
Collaborator - Principal Investigator, Idaho State University

Dr. Peterson received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Zoology at the University of Illinois-Urbana, his Ph.D. in Zoology at Washington State University, and conducted his postdoctoral work at the University of Chicago. He is currently a Professor of Zoology in the Department of Biological Sciences, a member of the Geotechnologies Program faculty at Idaho State University, and is Curator of Herpetology for the Idaho Museum of Natural History. Since 1988, Dr. Peterson has been involved in herpetological research and conservation efforts in Idaho and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, engaging in numerous survey, monitoring, and research projects with a number of organizations, guiding graduate student research projects, developing a herpetological database for Idaho, and creating and testing amphibian and reptile habitat models. His research interests include application of recent technologies (e.g., radiotelemetry, automated data acquisition, GIS, GPS, and remote sensing) to ecological studies and the conservation biology of amphibians and reptiles. He also is heavily involved with outreach education and conducts a number of herpetological workshops and courses.
Photo of Dr. David Pilliod Dr. David Pilliod
USGS, Aquatic Ecologist
Dr. Pilliod received his bachelor’s degree in Biology from the University of California - Santa Cruz and his Ph.D. in Ecology from Idaho State University. In 2001, David completed a post-doc at the University of Montana coordinating amphibian surveys in Montana and North Dakota for the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative. As a post-doc with the U.S. Forest Service Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute / Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center and an assistant professor at California Polytechnic State University, his research focused on the effects of land management and disturbances on amphibian and reptile populations. He now has two long-term amphibian monitoring projects: (1) investigating the effects of prescribed and wildland fires on stream amphibians and ecosystems in central Idaho since 2001, and (2) understanding the spatial ecology and population dynamics of high-elevation amphibian populations in central Idaho since 1995. In 2006, David joined the U.S. Geological Survey’s Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center and has been coordinating wildlife monitoring programs in the sagebrush biome, focusing primarily on reptiles and small mammals.