Home Archived April 13, 2016
(i)

U.S. Geological Survey

Maps, Imagery, and Publications Hazards Newsroom Education Jobs Partnerships Library About USGS Social Media

USGS Newsroom

USGS Newsroom  
 

AAAS Honors Three USGS Scientists as Fellows
Released: 1/19/1999

Contact Information:
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
Office of Communication
119 National Center
Reston, VA 20192
Susan Kropschot 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4469 | FAX: 703-648-4466




On January 23, 1999, U.S. Geological Survey scientists Gladys Cotter, Charles van Riper III, and Henry J. Moore II will be inducted as Fellows by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) during its annual meeting in Anaheim, California.

Each year, the AAAS elects to this position members whose "efforts on behalf of the advancement of science or its application are scientifically or socially distinguished." Recipients are presented fellowship certificates and rosette pins as part of the AAAS Fellows Forum ceremony in conjunction with the annual meeting.

Cotter, the associate chief biologist for Information in the Biological Resources Division of the USGS in Reston, Va., is being honored for her work in information management and communication. Her duties include overseeing the development of the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII), the biological component of the National Information Infrastructure. The NBII is a cooperative effort coordinated by the USGS that uses the Internet to increase access to data and information on the nation’s biological resources (http://www.nbii.gov). Van Riper is being honored for his research in the biological sciences. He is currently the station leader of the Colorado Plateau Field Station at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Ariz., which emphasizes research on plant and landscape ecology, endangered and declining vertebrate species, and spatial analysis and information management as it applies to research programs throughout the southwestern United States (http://fresc.usgs.gov).

Moore is being honored posthumously for his geologic and geographic research. Moore had a distinguished career in astrogeology and was involved in selecting the landing site for the Mars Pathfinder. Moore died suddenly in September 1998, three days after being elected an AAAS fellow.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science is the largest general scientific society in the world, representing all the scientific and engineering disciplines. Its 144,000 members include scientists and engineers, as well as policy makers, educators, journalists, and students.


The USGS serves the nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life.

Subscribe to receive the latest USGS news releases.

**** www.usgs.gov ****

Links and contacts within this release are valid at the time of publication.


 

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=1360
Page Contact Information: Ask USGS
Page Last Modified: 10/18/2005 10:33:55 AM