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October Science Picks -- Leads, Feeds and Story Seeds
Released: 10/28/2008

Contact Information:
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
Office of Communication
119 National Center
Reston, VA 20192
Jennifer LaVista 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4432

Jennifer LaVista 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4432

Jennifer LaVista 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4432

Jennifer LaVista 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4432

Jennifer LaVista 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4432

Jennifer LaVista 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4432

Jennifer LaVista 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4432

Jennifer LaVista 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4432

Jennifer LaVista 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4432

Jennifer LaVista 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4432

Jennifer LaVista 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4432

Jennifer LaVista 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4432

Jennifer LaVista 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4432



In this October edition of Science Picks, crack the mystery of freaky frog fungus, sneaky iguanas, a "Halloween" fish and what’s lurking in our drinking water. Glaciers and sea otters are disappearing, while deep-sea corals and devilishly hot geothermal energy are thriving. Don’t be spooked — read on for clues to these mysteries and more!

October Highlights:

  • Most Alaskan Glaciers Retreating, Thinning and Stagnating
  • Don't be Left Out! Two Weeks to ShakeOut
  • Discovery of a New Pacific Iguana Unravels Mystery
  • Sea Otter Decline Means Change of Menu for Aleutian Bald Eagles
  • Deep-Sea Corals in the Gulf of Mexico
  • Geothermal Energy: Let's Heat Things Up
  • What's Lurking in the Drinking Water?
  • Halloween Darter: Spooky New Species of Perch
  • Lingering Effects from Recent Hurricanes
  • Freaky Frog Fungus
  • Wind Energy: Will Fall Bird Migration be Smooth Sailing for All?
  • Scientific Crystal Ball: Tiny Bubbles Reveal Earth's History

 


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