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Amphibian Declines and Deformities: What is the Latest?
Released: 12/5/2000

Contact Information:
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
Office of Communication
119 National Center
Reston, VA 20192
Rebecca Phipps 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4414



Note to Editors: Additional information about amphibian declines and deformities is available at http://www.usgs.gov/amphibians.html.

What: A special opportunity for the news media to meet premiere scientists working on amphibians. They’ll discuss the issues: Why are amphibian populations declining? Why are more amphibians being found with deformities? Are amphibian die-offs increasing? What are the implications for other forms of life?

When: December 7, 2000, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Where: Department of the Interior, Room 6641, (1849 C St., NW, Washington, D.C.) Reporters are asked to call Rebecca Phipps (703) 648-4414 by 5 p.m. on Wednesday, December 6, 2000, if they plan to attend. Reporters must show press credentials including a picture identification to gain access to the Interior building.

*** Reporters from outside the DC area will have an opportunity to participate via a conference call with the scientists. For more details, and to register for the conference call, call Rebecca Phipps at (703) 648-4414 by 5 p.m. on Wednesday, December 6, 2000. ***

Who: Amphibian experts from across the country, including disease specialists, researchers and toxicologists.They are:

Dr. David Green - USGS pathologist specializing in amphibian diseases who has done recent research on chytrid fungus and other disease-causing agents.

Dr. Donald Sparling - USGS contaminants specialist on the effects of contaminants on amphibian decline, specifically in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

Dr. Carol Meteyer - USGS clinical pathologist, who will discuss recent advancements in amphibian malformations, specifically facial cleft malformation in northern leopard frogs.

Dr. Steven Corn - USGS herpetologist, an expert in amphibian population monitoring work in the Northern Rockies.

Dr. Chuck Peterson - Idaho State University, an amphibian monitoring researcher in Yellowstone National Park, whose work includes remotely sensed breeding habitat using a hyperspectral image spectrometer.

Dr. James Hanken - Harvard University and International Chair of the Declining Amphibians Population Task Force who is an expert on amphibian declines world-wide.

Dr. Susan Walls - USGS herpetologist, amphibian research and monitoring activities in the Lower Mississippi River Basin.


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